Painter

Laura Kay Weatherspoon

Laura Kay Weatherspoon

weatherspoon.jpg

Dare to be different! Life is simply amazing and I love to share the way I see the world through my artwork. I feel so blessed that I get to wake up each day and do what I love to do.

I was raised in the small farming town of Troy, Illinois. Growing up, my grandmother and mom would tell me stories about how I would sit at the living room window for hours and draw the birds long before I was even in school. Although I did a lot of drawing when I was young, it was the day my dad took me to a local art store that I was bit by the bug. That day, my dad bought me my very first box of prismacolors. I would sit around and draw for hours on end with that first box, mainly of horses from my imagination. That following summer I received second place at the Madison County Fair in Illinois, for a mare and foal drawing I did with that first set of prismacolors. From that day on, my dad would always say, “You need to be a freelance artist when you grow up.”

And well, here I am. I graduated from William Woods University, Summa Cum Laude, with a major in Equestrian Science and a minor in Art Education. I now own a studio in Fulton, Missouri where I have two kilns, a pottery wheel and all my painting supplies.

I love hiking, biking, running, camping, sailing and riding my horse. I also enjoy traveling or any activity that gets me outside in the fresh air where nature can inspire me. My camera usually accompanies me everywhere I go, as I am always looking for the next great photo opportunity for something I can take back to my studio to paint or sculpt.

My passion lies mainly with clay and ceramics. I use water based clays for throwing on the wheel, as well as hand building and sculptures. I use oil based clays in preparation for bronze sculptures. However, my passion for art goes far beyond the limits of cay. I enjoy doing palette knife paintings with my oil and acrylic paints. Another favorite is painting with my watercolors. The transparency of watercolors captured my imagination the first time I used them and I have loved them ever since. Stippling is another form of art I enjoy, and I find the end resulting immensely rewarding considering the hours spent in one project.

I want people to feel inspired by my work. God has blessed me with a talent and I want to use that talent to make other people smile. There is nothing more rewarding than seeing a vision of mine come to life on canvas or in my hands with clay and have people look at it and smile.

Contact me about commission work.

contact:
E: Laura Kay Weatherspoon


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Margaret Leslie Utterback

Margaret Leslie Utterback

"There are moments in our lives,
there are moments in a day, when
we seem to see beyond the usual.
Such are the moments of our greatest happiness.
Such are the moments of our greatest wisdom.
If one could but recall his vision by some
sort of sign. It was in this hope
that the arts were invented.
Sign-posts on the way to what may be.
Sign-posts toward greater knowledge."
Robert Henri; The Art Spirit

Today the sky is absolutely cobalt above, fading to pale rose madder at the horizon. I yearn for a stick of pastel with the same sense of blue, a sense of endless atmosphere. And one that would tell of the warmth or coolness of the breeze as it moves around me. And a stick of pastel that would generate the radiating sunlight, at dawn, at noon, or dusk. Today the objects in front of me are composed of a silent history. And again, I yearn for a stick of pastel that would tell it's tale, complicated with it's "self" and mine and another and another. The reality is that no single stick of color can replicate the beauty of nature or the complexities of a relationship. To copy is impossible; the attempt to copy is mundane. A painting is an image; a combination of the reality, the painter, and the viewer. And the reality is fleeting, instants of impressions, transmitted from the eye to the brain and translated in minute portions of time. The translated image of the painting only carries the "sign" of the artists visual "language," in hopes of a non-verbal communication and a connection with a reality.

contact:
E: Leslie Utterback
Tel: 573-445-2189
W: www.ottercreekstudio.com


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Cindy Smith

Cindy Smith

I grew up in Poplar Bluff, Missouri, and graduated from the University of Missouri. After living in Alabama and Mississippi for 26 years, I recently moved back to Columbia. It was in the south that I discovered my love of painting especially with an emphasis on bright colors.

It wasn't until I had raised my family and taught math for a number of years that I decided to develop my creative side. I have studied under several well-known artists in the south, each with different strengths and styles. Oil is my favorite medium and I especially like painting landscapes.

contact info:
T: 573-445-0897


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Barbara Martin Smith

Barbara Martin Smith

Rhythms of the process of creating are constant as well as ever changing. Omnipotence is present in these rhythms like a friend. When I retreat to my studio to paint, I carry this friend with me. Working with the fluidity of transparent watercolor on handmade paper parallels the seen and unseen, known and unknown, foreseen and recalled qualities of subject which emerge during the painting process. Each painting comes from within linking me with the past and the future. Each is a deliberate engagement with all that is mysterious and beautiful.

contact:
W: watercolorsmith.com
Tel: 314-961-6047
Mail: 980 North Berry Rd
Glendale, MO 6312


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Eric Seat

Eric Seat

by Lindsey Howald
with permission of the Columbia Daily Tribune

Eric Seat is a different kind of illustrator.

In a career field increasingly populated by graphic designers toting Macbooks, he works with traditional media - acrylics, oils, board. He holds texture and stylistic exaggerations to be as important and inspiring as the meaning of the text his work is meant to highlight.

And while the great illustrator Norman Rockwell created warm and fuzzy family scenes, Seat's portraits are delightfully eerie.

"I would like to think of it as more of a fine art," Seat said of his work.

The 27-year-old earned his bachelor's degree in communication arts and design from Virginia Commonwealth University. After attending the Illustration Academy, a workshop that features, among others, Kansas City's Mark English, Seat came away inspired by illustrators who had moved the genre from magazine pages to art gallery walls.

That's why, when Seat moved to Columbia from Leesburg, Va., he landed in an art gallery. This is his fourth month in the city, and he recently joined Columbia Art League and staffs the gallery once a week.

His portrait of Michael Moore, the filmmaker who made a name bashing President George W. Bush in films like Fahrenheit 9/11, also appeared in CAL's "Politically Speaking" exhibition. "It was a little portrait I did for my portfolio," he said. Asked if it lends some insight into his own political leanings, Seat stepped around a firm answer.

"I don't necessarily do portraits of people I like," he said. "I just thought I'd do it for my portfolio since he's in the public eye a lot. I was definitely interested in having political beliefs" portrayed in my artwork "a while ago, but not so much now."

While he might be hopeful about linking illustration with fine art, Seat depends on assignments from publications. Therefore his portfolio is ultimately designed to market his drawing talents. Inspired by the exaggerated caricatures of Philip Burke and grotesque figures of Lucian Freud, Seat's portfolio contains recognizable subjects such as Moore, Catherine Zeta-Jones and Kurt Vonnegut.

"For illustration work, it definitely needs to be an image that fits the needs for the publication," he said. He must be doing something right: His work has received awards from the Society of Illustrators, Communication Arts magazine and Print magazine.

He moved away from the busy sprawl of the Washington, D.C., bedroom community with his retired parents. Talented but shy, he's still struggling to find his footing.

"You know, finding work in illustration is certainly a slow progression for me," Seat said. In Virginia, he produced work for Military History magazine and taught occasional illustration workshops while working part time in a frame store. He's currently working on a series of illustrations for Read magazine, depicting George Orwell's Animal Farm for middle school-age readers.

Eric Seat selected for international
illustration competition
in New York City

(Feb. 2010)

contact:
W: www.ericseat.com
Tel: 703-727-5372


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Amy Schomaker

Amy Schomaker

Amy Schomaker’s love of texture and form are apparent in her diverse use of handmade paper, painted paper and low-relief dimensional collages and paintings. 

She completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree at the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1990 concentrating in oil painting and printmaking. A St. Louis native, she now considers Columbia Missouri her home. 

Amy is continuing to learn new techniques and applications in papermaking as a member of the Fiber Arts Study Group through the Columbia Weaver’s and Spinners Guild. Her work can be seen in a variety of locations throughout Columbia in the Art League’s Community Exhibit Program.


A medley of artwork lines both walls like playful sentinels. These are the colorfully manifest creations of Columbia artist Amy Schomaker, bringing life and light to the otherwise gray corridor of Boone County Regional Hospital. Bold acrylic paintings, silkscreen prints, delicate torn paper collages, and painted paper creations hang neatly, side by side. She holds no objections against exhibiting early work alongside her latest creations. “Art doesn’t have an expiration date like milk,” Schomaker contends. 

Schomaker pursued a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in oil painting as well as printmaking at the University of Missouri in the late 1980s. Additional art making techniques were acquired throughout the four years Schomaker spent teaching art to middle school students and the influences she encountered as a member of the Columbia Weaver’s and Spinner’s guild. Schomaker attributes much of her artistic growth to Leandra Spangler, a mentor and friend, who set inspiration in her to continue developing as an artist.

Although Schomaker’s artwork has many influences, the most essential influence is her own: and it proves to be the single tie that binds the variety of art forms together. Each work embodies Schomaker’s veneration of nature and her playful dance with unconventionality and inventiveness.

“You don’t have to color inside [the lines],” Schomaker insists. She allows this concept to trickle over into her paintings which are layered, folded, cut, burned, or torn to effect multi-dimensionality. Variations on these techniques encourage shadow play arising from the surrounding light situations to pass through the artwork, resulting in many transient impressions of the painting. 

Organic elements enter into Schomaker’s hand painted paper modeling and collages. She adds cooked down plant fibers to her handmade paper before “combing” distinctive textures onto each paper sheet. Her paper works are a continuation on the theme of mingling actual and applied perspectives and are what she describes as “low relief sculptures.” 

Schomaker regularly participates in quarterly community exhibit programs, Fiber Arts tours, and regional art exhibits. She has her sights set on expanding her audience and will undoubtedly continue developing and applying new techniques in her art forms as life itself unfolds alongside her.

by Lindsey Cole


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Renee Nilges

Renee Nilges

Art as Life

Creating art stills my mind and I can only think about the task at hand. The brush strokes quiet and comfort me. I even feel my breathing slow, and I am transported far away. Art is truly a gift in that it helps me live in the present and keeps me looking forward. I get so excited about a new piece that sometimes a painting is named before I even produce it. It’s already been created in my mind.

As a kid, I have always had my hands in something. I try many different mediums and like to experiment. There are endless possibilities to explore. Art is like an old friend that keeps welcoming me back to grow better than I was before.

I have been painting and drawing professionally since 1998. My journey began by drawing pencil portraits of people and pets. Soon people were asking me to do oil paintings of their homes and farms. In addition to fine art, a background in commercial art made it possible for me to create logos and illustrations. Commissions have included everything from painting murals and statues to illustrating a children’s book and coloring book. It has been quite an adventure so far.

In 2001, I began sharing art in a new way by teaching oil painting class. I am so proud of my students! It is a great joy to see them grow artistically. I’ve found growth too, through teaching them. In this right brain, left brain world, I tell them, “Just remember, when you’re painting, you’re in your right mind!”

Life as an artist is both rewarding and challenging. Yes, we have responsibilities, but there always has to be room to play. When I am really lost in a project and the hours fly by, that’s when it seems to just fall out of my brush and flow onto the canvas! Those are the pieces that people tell me they appreciate the most. It comes from a place I really don’t understand, but I am very thankful. The beauty between the real world we live in and the canvas start to blend together. That is when the art is real. That is when I eat, sleep and breathe art as life.

contact:
W: www.reneenilges.com
T: 573-680-9054


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Randy McDermit

Randy McDermit

I am a local Columbia artist who has spent the majority of my life in or around Columbia. Most of my work has been with acrylic paint; however, I’ve also worked with charcoal, pastel, and pen and ink. I began college as an art major at Columbia College, but after two years I changed my major to psychology and transferred to MIZZOU. I didn’t pick it up again until after I graduated, moved to St. Louis, and started working for the state of Missouri. In St. Louis I moved into a studio apartment and started doing charcoal drawings, posting them all over my walls. At that time I wasn’t concerned with a finished product. I just attacked the paper with aggression and vigor and then set it aside to start another one. I didn’t show them to anyone for months, but steadily I felt I was making progress. Eventually I started working in bits of color using pastels until I developed a love of color.

My early work was almost exclusively charcoal and pastel and greatly shaped the development of my style. I always enjoyed the feel and expressiveness of charcoal and pastel. My application was loose, physical and cathartic. Whether it was the medium that drew me to my subject matter or the other way around, I found satisfaction in depicting simple, dramatic gestures, figures and faces. It was more about capturing the intensity of a single moment rather than complex narratives or concepts. When I made the gradual transition from pastel to acrylic, I brought with me the same approach. The translation has produced some interesting results, and those early days continue to influence my direction. When I get off track, I always go back and do a few charcoals to reconnect.

I have always found the task in every artwork is to bridge the elements of connection and conflict. I feel like if I am authentically connected and present everything else will fall into place. The older I get, the more I trust my intuition. I trust that if I am fully engaged in the process of self expression, a truth will reveal itself. Not every truth, but a truth nevertheless.

contact:
W:artaccidental.blogspot.com
Tel: 573-424-0216


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Kay McCarthy

Kay McCarthy

I can't remember a time in my life when I was not drawing, painting or working on an art project. Graduating from the University of North Dakota with a bachelor's degree in fine arts I soon found that my love of the arts would take another turn. I started with an administrative career in non-profits which ultimately translated into arts administration. Now retired from the City of Columbia's Office of Cultural Affairs, I spend as much of my time as possible doing what I love best...painting my favorite subjects, people and dogs, from photographs in my home studio. Nothing is more satisfying than using the medium of watercolor and seeing an image emerge to tell it's own story.

One day's happiness often predicts the next day's creativity. - Teresa Amabile


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Hope Martin

Hope Martin

I love to zoom in on something small and make it big! All those seemingly little details become large, prominent and important. To me, that is very important; all those little things. They’re not so little.

I aim, with my art, to make people slow down and notice the beauty of the things that they miss. I want to help people connect with that beauty and maybe even help them find a sense of wonder they didn’t know they were missing.


My medium of choice is pastels. I also use black ink with watercolor and sometimes instant coffee.

contact:
573-239-5606
www.hopemartinartist.com


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Bonnie Margolis

Bonnie Margolis

Watercolor Acrylic Mixed Media

I am a long-time resident of Columbia. Recently retired from many years teaching American and Women’s History, I have enjoyed art since my parents first provided me with crayons, paper and paints as a little girl growing up in Ohio.

I have always been enamored of the Impressionist painters and try to capture that sense of light and color in my work. My seascapes and landscapes have been inspired by summers spent in northern Michigan and visits to the coast of Maine. I play the flute and piano and have rendered my flute in a variety of media - watercolor, pencil, lithographs and pen and ink.

I have taken classes at the Cleveland Institute of Art and studied privately with Sandy Diamond in Cleveland in addition to workshops in drawing, Japanese woodblock printing, lithography, watercolor and acrylic as a student at the Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan and later at the University of Missouri, Columbia. I am delighted to have the time and space in my home to pursue art more fully and enjoy experimenting in mixed media. I am a member of the Columbia Art League and the Mid-Missouri Arts Alliance of Ashland, MO.


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Bill Manion

Bill Manion

Returning to regular work with brush and pen has been an experience to which I have long looked forward. Now time and a fun place to work give me the opportunity to try styles and combinations.

I don’t have any rules going into a painting or a cartoon. Sometimes I have an idea of what I want but most of the time I just let the abstraction happen or the humor of the character build. I love the shape of bottles and vessels and work these into much of what I do. I am interested in cartoon outlines and the flows of abstract. All figure paintings start with a cartoon. Under all paintings somewhere there is an abstract. Some of my work blends the two. As an abstract grows with layer after layer of color I begin to see a form or a shape, or I will sketch out a form and begin, looking for the energy of color that makes a work pop.

Works of art should brighten and highlight every wall, so I like to play with color. I am not afraid of color, especially the deep hues and tones of red and its compliments. A blend of red and yellow, wet into wet, makes me smile. A black and white painting or drawing can gain dimension with that splash of color that gives it life or makes a mood. I love watching how light changes through a wine bottle. I love the colors of sunsets over the water. I will keep trying to capture those colors, tones, humor, moods, and the great feeling of forever sunsets that a work of art brings to me and to others.

Designs, cartoons, and the love of fine art has been a part of my life since high school. The dream of learning to draw and paint showed in air brushed T-shirts in college. Later, a cartoon, “Catch Pen,” laughing with the Cowboy life by “Billy Bob and friends,” was in rodeo news and horseman magazines for several years. A time to get serious with a business career delayed regular art work for several years. I continued to study with artist friends around the country while building a major art collection and working with art support groups in several cities. Moving back to Missouri with a fun studio overlooking the Lake of the Ozarks, I have returned to drawing, design, and movement of color. Paintings have placed in juried shows along with character development and design for commercial operations.

in studio with Mystique


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Changwon Lee

Changwon Lee

My specialty is mechanical engineering, in which I hold a Phd. During my career I worked as a government officer, a researcher for a national research institute, and a general manager for a large organization. I only started oil painting after my retirement in 2011, when I attended an oil painting class at the Institute of Fine Arts and Design Education in Korea. Since then I have painted every day. My first solo exhibition was in Seoul in 2012. Since then my solo exhibitions have been centered on the theme of "Dream of Recombination". My painting is a creative journey to put small recollections from the past into a backpack, get on the wagon of the present, and leave for the future. In my third solo exhibition, the theme was Recombination III with respect to the communion between nature and life.

I believe that the creative journey is through a process of Trans-reality. Creative Trans-realism is a journey wherein the artist uses an endless stream from his conscious and subconscious beyond everyday life, through past life and mental imagery. This endless journey of consciousness is infinitely sustainable and brings artistic freedom and peace.

contact:
W: www.artabus.com/changwon/
W: www.facebook.com/changwon.lee.9083


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Sharyn Hyatt

Sharyn Hyatt

Sharyn received her undergraduate degree from the University of Georgia, her Masters of Fine Arts from Clemson University, and has studied and traveled in Europe. She has taught art at the secondary and college levels, has published in several journals, and has work on the cover of three books. Hyatt's work can be found in numerous public and private collections including the Asheville Art Museum, Southwestern Bell of St. Louis, Boone County National Bank, the University of Missouri Hospital and Clinics, the Columbia Chamber of Commerce, and the collection of August Busch Jr. In addition she has shown in numerous group shows as well as in 14 solo exhibitions.

For the past 25 years, Hyatt has considered her most creative endeavor to be teaching and she has had the privilege of working with more than 2,000 emerging young artists. Sharyn feels most comfortable with the titles "teacher" and "mom" but as of 2008 could be found edging back into the art scene.


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John Michael Holman

John Michael Holman

The portrait/landscape/ narrative has been a familiar subject within my history of painting. The process of creating and methodology allows me to develop each piece individually. It also brings me the most satisfaction; even if considered imperfect or slightly awkward in technique by academic standards. Being a self-taught artist has its rewards and allows me the freedom to go outside the lines and paint what I feel and see without restraint.

My more visceral works are achieved through the application of metallic paints plus the occasional inter-vention of the ‘happy accident’ or chance. All these elements contribute in the process of making or de-constructing my paintings. The creative process for me is one of release, provocation and ultimately my way of expressing my memories of places visited and the emotional attachments that accompany them.

This is more apparent as the viewer approaches the completed works; with surfaces dissolving into a color pallet of irregular textures and unconscious imagery. From an academic perspective, I break rules and as a self-taught artist I am completely at peace with that concept. I paint what I feel and if it provokes the viewer with any reaction whether good or bad; then I have done my job.

Thank you for viewing my creations.

Contact:
T: 660-202-2428
W: www.facebook.com/john.m.holman


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Kerry Mulvania Hirth

Kerry Mulvania Hirth

I was born with the ability to hear in color, a blending of the senses called synesthesia.  I use that natural ability to paint music.  Although they may appear to be abstract, my paintings are grounded in my personal experience of sound.  For me, music is lit up with color and full of patterns to recognize, problems to solve, and connections to make.  Essentially, my paintings are a code that I use to make sense of and record what I think and experience.  No matter how sophisticated a problem is or how fragile or fleeting a thing is before me, I can use my paint to comprehend it and reflect it truly.

contact info:
W: www.kerryhirth.com


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Jan Hager-Klein

Jan Hager-Klein

hager.jpg

I’m a listener and a watcher...have been all my life. My professional life took me to 11 countries in Europe, Asia, all over the USA as a Human Resources manager, a counselor, and college professor.

Now I’m in Missouri and have enjoyed painting for the last 14 years, alone or with friends on destination painting experiences. Italy has called us twice; Hopetown, Bahamas was a great alone get away; and Carmel, California calls again and again. I’ve taken classes at Webster University and private lessons with Dong Feng Li, Billyo O’Donnel, John Porter Lasater IV, Qiang Huang, and with Ruo Li.

I paint because I like the process. Each painting is like a puzzle that I slowly put together whether is it a landscape, city scape, interior, or abstract. I come from painters with a mother, brother, and a son who all make their living as painters. I grew up with my mother - Helen Hager - painting to classical music when I got home from school. The smell of turpentine and open windows back then was a peaceful happy time.

I hope you enjoy my work.


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William Farrand

William Farrand

I had a few art courses in college. If the draft had not been breathing down my neck in 1969, I would have changed majors from biology to fine arts. After the army, my career with National and State Park agencies led me to many places people rarely find. Within the grand landscapes of Missouri and the western United States there are hidden, intimate spaces. Using snapshots to help find a view for composition, I try to let my experiences with place and my love of color flow onto paper. I experimented with acrylics and watercolor before finding water color pencils. Their range of color, adaptability to wash, and control of detail seemed to fit my efforts to recreate my favorite places on watercolor paper. I still look for those hidden places, but when found, I now mentally extract their subtle colors and assemble a view that attempts to relate the experience.

I live and draw in Columbia, calling it home for the second time. It’s the best town I have found in nine states.


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Cynthia Durost

Cynthia Durost

I paint because I am struck by the multitude of colors and sights of Nature. I paint as a form of meditation releasing my energy, joy, sadness, or love. I paint as an expression of my relation to the whole, to Nature. The browns, blues, ochres, reds, purples, blacks, and yellow are so vivid; even the snow presents color in reverse. I also have a longing for the space of Nature: the sky, the water, the trees, the rocks opening up. I see the relationship between forms and space - two trees stand juxtaposed leaning and finally encircling each other, two friends. I want only to keep recording my feeling in the natural space. The best of my painting experience exists in my being present spontaneously painting with the flow of water and color.

Sometimes, I paint a scene over and over, later to learn a message exists. In New Mexico, for instance, I paint a mountain scene again and again, later to learn Zuni women ascend the heights of this mountain to gather a ceremonial flower which grows only on this mountain. I am drawn to certain places, the fields and marshes and woods of New England, the canyonlands, rivers, and mountains of New Mexico and Arizona, the islands of Cape Verde, or the rainforests of Costa Rica. There is for me a connecting force between mind and Nature, a play of consciousness and spirit. I acknowledge land and wild animals, and especially the space without the importance of humans. The artist in me follows instinct and intuition, is connected to all peoples, crosses all boundaries, is open and searching.

I also believe firmly in sharing and passing on the tradition and experience of painting and being an artist. In this exchange with many others, I continue to learn and grow and play.

contact info:
T: 573-355-2294


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Nancy DeClue

Nancy DeClue

declue.jpg

by Lindsey Howald

Although her content can vary from meditations on religious texts to vibrant abstracts from nature, Nancy DeClue’s work is consistently alive. The beauty of her painting is that while deeply influenced by the innate ebb and flow of nature’s energy, it seldom depicts the very landscape that inspired her. Rather, it is the fuel of conceptualism that drives her work, and the way it is translated onto the canvas often seems completely separate from the moment that inspired it.

“The work takes on its own life,” she says. “Like going from air to a molecule, it’s an evolution.”

DeClue, born in 1954 in Jefferson City, originally came to the University of Missouri to get her art history degree: “I was going to be the best damn curator ever,” she laughs. However, practicality called, and DeClue put this dream aside to begin what would be a lifelong, devoted career in nursing. Currently a nurse at the Missouri Cancer Associates, DeClue admits, “It has turned out that I do love it. But it’s not my passion.”

Like all true artists, DeClue cannot remember a time in her life she wasn’t creating. She began to pursue her work in earnest in 2002, when complications from a neck surgery forced her to slow down life’s obligations, allowing her art to flood in. In 2005, she was selected for an intensive period of study at the prestigious Santa Fe Art Institute. For two months, DeClue lived and worked in community with other artists in art-infused New Mexico, which helped her develop her own personal style.

“I didn’t realize until several years ago that all people didn’t see the world the way I did,” she says. “It was like an epiphany – I realized that what I do is truly different.”

DeClue’s lack of formal art training has both its advantages and disadvantages. Though she admits she sometimes gets in over her head with a project, never having learned the limitations of certain media allows her to work purely from the visions that appear in her head. As with Small Wonders (upper right), the 2005 work to thank for her acceptance to the Santa Fe Art Institute, DeClue had never been warned a 48”x54” linoleum block print would be an ambitious project, and therefore didn’t think to shy away from it. Small Wonders, which is a cry for this culture to reverse its de-mystification of Nature, now hangs in DeClue’s downtown coffee haunt, Lakota.

Rather than settling for representation, DeClue entreats viewers to enter her state of mind. In a recent multi-media collage series she has nicknamed The Word (bottom right), she writes or pastes text from altar prayers, a German Bible and other cultural religious influences, creating chaos from structural antiquity. By forcing these concepts to collide, she disrupts the mutual exclusivity these old religions have claimed.

“The concept is, God is God,” she explains. “What is the difference between religions? Why are we pointing the finger and damning one another? There is a universality here.”

Freed from the burden of defining her work in art historical terms, DeClue allows her art, simply, to be what it is. When asked about her influences, she shakes her head firmly. “I look at all other work, and there’s nothing I find that I don’t like. I take every opportunity to see every piece of art I can.”


Artist Statement

‘the image chooses the artist’, Evri Kwong to myself, 2005.

The ‘image’ has always chosen me. It can be triggered by a dream, a concept, an event, a social reality, a tiny bloom, an insect with gossamer wings-something touches my soul.

The ‘image’ or idea stays with me. It gestates. It then chooses a medium. It grows in intensity until I have to let it out. The resulting work or works often take on a life of their own. Almost self determined.

This is how a series or large piece is conceived. This is my motivation-love colored with passion.

My thirty plus years as a nurse, and especially my years in oncology, place these constructs within my unique life experience and philosophy.

Deep respect and acute appreciation for all forms of life are interwoven with spirituality. Often a statement of society and its ‘norms’ or direction (especially when childishly self-serving) are veiled in my pieces. It is what drives my production.

Sometimes-sheer breathtaking beauty is the muse.

Sometimes-the attempt to grasp quantum mechanics. Perhaps-music, or the laugh of a child.

ART IS THE REPRESENTATION OF PASSION.

Contact:
T: 573-590-0162


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