Jeweler

Linda Schwermer

Linda Schwermer

Midoriworld Designs

Here you will find unique handmade jewelry. I am influenced by the simplicity of the Japanese style with an exotic twist. I try to recycle as much as possible and use mostly natural materials: waxed cotton cord, leather, rubber, carved bone and horn beads, antique hammered buttons as well as imported artifacts from Africa and China for interest. Each piece is handcrafted by me to be a unique and interesting piece of jewelry.

Descriptions:

#279 - African fish vertebra necklace. Fish vertebra, black glass beads, African trade beads with large black carved Asian disk.

#261 - Orange repurposed coral horizontal beads ladder stacked with black glass beads, black vinyl disks from Nigeria, brass Asian disks and hand bent brass rings also from Nigeria.

#340 - Hammered copper horizontal bar with strands of rough turquoise and copper beads for accent on copper chain.

#1008 - Wearable Art. Asymmetrical necklace. Rough amber beads, large brown African seed bead, carved bone Asian beads, on black rubber cord. Framed in black frame with handmade paper and torn recycled paper back ground. Necklace is easily removable to wear.


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Farah Nieuwenhuizen

Farah Nieuwenhuizen

Farah Nieuwenhuizen has lived and traveled throughout Western Europe, Brazil, Canada, and the United States of America. These experiences laid the basis for her lifelong concern with cultural diversity.

She studied painting at the Escola de Belas Artes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, before she continued her studies in the visual arts at Washington University in St. Louis and at the University of Missouri in Columbia where she received her bachelor's degree in art education, K–12.

For twenty years she taught at Hickman High School in Columbia, where she was recognized as an outstanding teacher. She has written and reviewed art curriculum for the Columbia Public Schools. While teaching at Hickman High School, she became the major contributor to the production of the annual multicultural assembly.

Ms. Nieuwenhuizen has received several awards for her painting, batik, ceramics, jewelry, and fiber arts at the Missouri State Fair in Sedalia and art shows at the Boone County National Bank and the Columbia Art League. Her artwork has been on display in several regional art exhibits. Also, she has taught art education at the University of Missouri's College of Education, where she received a High Flyer Award in fall 2001.


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India Marie Knowles

India Marie Knowles

For as long as I can remember there has been an artist within eager to break free and express herself. Occasionally I have found an outlet for my high need to create, but jewelry making has captured my imagination as nothing I have tried before. Since retiring from my private practice as a licensed professional counselor in 2002, what I began as a hobby has evolved into an addiction and is now a small business. Most of my work incorporates semiprecious gemstones and sterling silver or 14K gold-filled wire and findings. I also enjoy using lampwork and other handcrafted beads.

Most recently, however, bead embroidery has become my obsession. Gemstones, small freshwater pearls, tiny seed beads and bugle beads lend themselves to unlimited designs and color. I love allowing the patterns to evolve as I work rather than utilizing a plan. Pieces that are asymmetrical in design almost always prove to be gratifying to me, as I like seeing the final coming together of seemingly disparate components.

It is always a joy to see people wearing and apparently enjoying pieces I have made, and I am especially pleased when items are purchased as gifts. A song by Harry Chapin entitled “Mr Tanner” comes to mind when I consider my work. Mr. Tanner, the owner of a dry cleaning shop, loved to sing but was panned by critics in his first New York concert. The line, “He did not know how well he sang; it just made him whole” is a poignant theme in the song. As I look at the works of other jewelry artists, I do not know how well I create; it just makes me whole.

Items are available for viewing and/or purchase at
Columbia Art League in Columbia and Missouri Hawthorn Galleries in Springfield, Missouri, or by appointment (contact info below).

contact info:
Tel: 573-449-7754


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Elle Hinnah

Elle Hinnah

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Elle has been passionate about art and creating things all of her life. It started out with sewing when she was just 4 years old. Her grandmother, who hand-stitched elaborate Barbie Doll clothes, told her she could learn to sew when she could thread her own needle. Elle, never being one to think she was unable to do anything, accepted the challenge and relentlessly attempted to thread the needle until the task was accomplished. That drive and passion is still ever present in everything she does.

Elle’s focus now is metalsmith jewelry made with copper, silver, or brass and features gemstones. She also enjoys making wire-wrapped jewelry with silver, gold and rose gold wire. She has always had a fascination with gemstones and enjoys working with natural stones. She also enjoys working with different metals, her favorite being silver.

She finds inspiration for her pieces in many different places. For gemstone pieces, she tries to think of what will complement each individual stone best, making each piece a unique creation. Sometimes inspiration comes from the shape of a piece of metal. Other times, it’s none of those things. It could be a piece made with a specific person in mind. These are her favorite pieces to make: pieces that compliment a person’s character and personality.

Elle is accepting commissioned worked through appointment.

contact:
W: www.kre8vstudioz.com


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