Cindy Smith

Cindy Smith

I grew up in Poplar Bluff, Missouri, and graduated from the University of Missouri. After living in Alabama and Mississippi for 26 years, I recently moved back to Columbia. It was in the south that I discovered my love of painting especially with an emphasis on bright colors.

It wasn't until I had raised my family and taught math for a number of years that I decided to develop my creative side. I have studied under several well-known artists in the south, each with different strengths and styles. Oil is my favorite medium and I especially like painting landscapes.

contact info:
T: 573-445-0897


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Barbara Martin Smith

Barbara Martin Smith

Rhythms of the process of creating are constant as well as ever changing. Omnipotence is present in these rhythms like a friend. When I retreat to my studio to paint, I carry this friend with me. Working with the fluidity of transparent watercolor on handmade paper parallels the seen and unseen, known and unknown, foreseen and recalled qualities of subject which emerge during the painting process. Each painting comes from within linking me with the past and the future. Each is a deliberate engagement with all that is mysterious and beautiful.

contact:
W: watercolorsmith.com
Tel: 314-961-6047
Mail: 980 North Berry Rd
Glendale, MO 6312


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Jennifer Slouha

Jennifer Slouha

I am a self-taught artist and primarily work in graphite, colored pencil and acrylic. I was born in Solon, Iowa, and have lived in many different places since I was young. My aunt was a big influence early on to my creativity; so were several great art teachers in high school. After high school I went on to work and to raise a family. About ten years ago I realized there was a market for my work, and I began taking commissions that included pet portraits, vehicles and painting the image of a hospital directly onto the original cornerstone of the hospital. I also sold my art in galleries in Tucson, Arizona.

The majority of my work tends to focus on details, specifically my graphite drawings, which I enjoy the most. My acrylic paintings depict bright, cheerful colors and are usually based on inspiration from nature. I also love working in colored pencil because of the detail and beautiful colors that can be achieved. As for the source of my inspiration, I cannot say there is any specific thing that evokes my creativity. I am inspired by all of my surroundings, what I see and experience. I strive to show these experiences in the work I create.

contact:
T: 573-397-3573
W:www.jenniferslouha.com


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Mike Seat

Mike Seat

Tour de Force:

Photographer's artful images whisk viewers away to the iconic beauty of Venice

Officially speaking, Columbia's sister cities are located in Kutaisi, Republic of Georgia; Suncheon City, South Korea; Hakusan City, Japan; Sibiu, Romania; and Qingdao, China. Were one to judge solely on this summer's artistic offerings, however, he or she might believe Columbia has entered into a familial relationship with several of Italy's most historic cities.

Woody Allen's latest wistful travelogue, "To Rome with Love," recently wrapped a residency at Ragtag Cinema. And, starting tomorrow, the MSA/GPC Craft Studio Gallery, located at the University of Missouri, plays host to a collection of gorgeous images from that grand city of canals, Venice. The scenes were first conceived and composed in the mind's eye of Mike Seat, a local artist whose work has been visible at the Columbia Art League, among a number of venues. These are no mere vacation photos but instead function as a testament to the city's glory while also capturing the quiet gravity and simplicity that upholds it.

Relative Values

Art has been a Seat family value for generations. Growing up in suburban St. Louis, Seat watched intently as his father, who was in advertising, engaged creativity both for professional pursuits and personal pleasure. His father drew and painted, applied his hand to creating very detailed lettering on model train cars and, in an age before digital devices, completed graphic design projects by hand as well.

But witnessing his father's efforts in the darkroom was most magical and memorable. Seat recalled the delight and awe with which he watched his father execute each step in the process of creating a photograph, a wonder that culminated with the image revealing itself, as if by magic. "That just held so much fascination for me, to see that image appear on paper," he said. "I guess it was profound for me, really."

Seat spent the majority of his career in darkrooms of a different sort, analyzing radar screens as an air traffic controller. From time to time, he found ways to blend his passion for photography and his working environs, preserving the majesty of the more unique planes that landed at Dulles International Airport in the nation's capital.

Despite pouring his energy into other matters, Seat and his wife, Sarah, who studied art education in college, continued to place a premium on creativity in their home, leaving the chain from Seat's father to his own son unbroken. Eric Seat, also a Columbia resident, is a highly skilled artist and illustrator, whose work has been exhibited in a number of contexts and was selected to grace the city of Columbia's commemorative poster in 2010. Mike Seat said any artistic emphasis the couple bequeathed was subconscious and simply natural, but the results are difficult to dispute. "We always encouraged him," Seat said. "I think he perceived that we respected art a lot and we placed a value on it."

Mike Seat and Eric Seat enjoyed the opportunity to collaborate in 2010 when CAL held an exhibit titled "Relative Values," bringing together culture-makers from the same family. The Seats created something of a mini-series or multifaceted work, juxtaposing Eric's painting and Mike's burgeoning work in another medium, pottery. In speaking about their work with the Tribune, Eric Seat traced the tangible partnership back to the intangible ways in which his family's creative energy had worked itself out in his acts and art-making.

"Even though my father and I are working in very different mediums, I think our submissions show that the Seats have an urge to create through visual art," he said. "… The piece we did in conjunction for the 'Relative Values' show, 'Seat Plate,' is the first work of art that we've done in this fashion, and I think it exemplifies the quirky and humorous spirit of our family name. The piece also shows how our mediums can work together in an unusual way.

"My parents have been the absolute greatest at nurturing my artistic abilities over the years," he added. "They have always encouraged me to pursue my illustration and painting endeavors, and I am very grateful to them for that."

A Creative Community

The Seats quickly made themselves at home in Columbia, moving here in 2008 when Mike Seat retired. Knowing that the community was a creative one largely informed their decision, and Seat has certainly availed himself of avenues to grow artfully where he is now planted. He is no stranger to venues such as Access Arts, the Craft Studio and, of course, CAL, where he has exhibited and volunteers weekly.

"He's passionate in his enthusiasm for what the gallery does on a week-by-week basis and also for what CAL represents to the community," CAL Executive Director Diana Moxon said in an email. "He is an eternally cheerful and engaged member of the CAL family and a great sounding board for me if I need some advice."

Indeed, Seat's eyes lit up as he described interacting with other artists, saying he feels "part of something, part of a creative movement." As he revolves through various artistic groups, the creative energy he's exposed to has helped his own work evolve. This can be seen not only in the development of his photography but as he ventures into mediums such as pottery, which he had not tried before moving to town.

"It was so exciting to see him start his journey with clay, and I was amazed at how fast he developed his own voice and an impressive level of workmanship," Moxon said.

Moxon amplified her appreciation for Seat and his family, mentioning the ways they've contributed not only to the cultural community but the city at large by advocating for better public transport and more sustainable policy-making. "The day the Seats chose to move to Columbia was really our lucky day," she said.

Water and Light

Seat's forthcoming exhibit captures a journey he and Sarah Seat took this spring, in observance of their 33rd anniversary and both of them turning 60.

"It's just a magical place," Seat said of Venice, before joking, "You can't take a bad photo in Venice. … the hardest part, of course, is there's a tourist in every shot."

What makes the Italian city among the planet's most photogenic is a singular "combination of romance and history and art and architecture," he said. Two of the city's predominant features — water and light — act as main characters in Seat's work, moving through the canon of images like actors in a play, changing countenance and affecting the demeanor of everything and everyone around them in singular ways depending on the scene and setup. "The water in Venice looks different in almost every image," he said. "The light can have such an amazing effect, changing the colors and reflections."

Seat's work certainly captures the exotic allure of Venice: stately bridges, winding waterways, striking colors and ebullient street performers show up, adding to and reflecting the city's inherent charisma and romanticism, much in the same ways water and light interact. Seat also labored to find moments of stillness and sleepiness, times when the city was in a state of repose rather than revelry. Among his favorite images are that captured on the water which flowed through smaller, more out-of-the-way canals.

"Those are scenes you can't get to unless you're on a boat," he said. "… You felt like you were seeing the real intimate side of the city. And, also, you felt more like it was yours because you didn't have so many people around."

While the amplified dynamics that sound through Venice receive most of the attention, Seat also found ways to portray the quietude, drawing out something of the city's normalcy, reminding viewers that real people live and work in Venice — it is not just a historic playground for tourists and art lovers. Among the scenes that add variety to Seat's collection, and remind us of the variety of life, is that of a solitary woman sitting at a vaporetto stop, waiting for a public transport to carry her across the water home. A full day's labor is written across her face, the scene like simple but profound poetry.

Sharing the Experience

Naturally, Seat said one of the greatest joys of the journey was sharing it with his wife. In his exhibit, they bend that common experience outward to the viewer. Initially, he was reluctant even to post his images on Facebook, not wanting to flaunt the excursion. But, after doing so, and receiving a warm outpouring of delight and encouragement, he pressed the matter further, pursuing an exhibit of his own.

Ultimately, he hopes viewers encounter the meaning in a term he has heard used to describe Venice: "elegant decay." Even amid the city's brilliant, enduring history, a tragic and temporal feeling exists as concerns abound as to whether the water that has so beautifully weathered the city could be its eventual undoing. A 2008 CNN article detailed worries about flooding, reporting that UNESCO had warned local officials that rising sea levels could lead to perpetual flooding and dramatic changes in water stages within the next century.

"You get the feeling it is this very fragile, beautiful thing that may not be there forever," Seat said.

In Seat's work, all the art and awe he enjoyed with his eyes are transmitted to the viewer. Whether Venice can remain a siren city, calling travelers to its waterways, the documents he and others provide ensure its spirit and soul remain a part of our common consciousness.

by Aarik Danielsen, Columbia Daily Tribune, July 29, 2012
reposted with permission. Original article.

contact info:
W: www.mikeseat.com


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Eric Seat

Eric Seat

by Lindsey Howald
with permission of the Columbia Daily Tribune

Eric Seat is a different kind of illustrator.

In a career field increasingly populated by graphic designers toting Macbooks, he works with traditional media - acrylics, oils, board. He holds texture and stylistic exaggerations to be as important and inspiring as the meaning of the text his work is meant to highlight.

And while the great illustrator Norman Rockwell created warm and fuzzy family scenes, Seat's portraits are delightfully eerie.

"I would like to think of it as more of a fine art," Seat said of his work.

The 27-year-old earned his bachelor's degree in communication arts and design from Virginia Commonwealth University. After attending the Illustration Academy, a workshop that features, among others, Kansas City's Mark English, Seat came away inspired by illustrators who had moved the genre from magazine pages to art gallery walls.

That's why, when Seat moved to Columbia from Leesburg, Va., he landed in an art gallery. This is his fourth month in the city, and he recently joined Columbia Art League and staffs the gallery once a week.

His portrait of Michael Moore, the filmmaker who made a name bashing President George W. Bush in films like Fahrenheit 9/11, also appeared in CAL's "Politically Speaking" exhibition. "It was a little portrait I did for my portfolio," he said. Asked if it lends some insight into his own political leanings, Seat stepped around a firm answer.

"I don't necessarily do portraits of people I like," he said. "I just thought I'd do it for my portfolio since he's in the public eye a lot. I was definitely interested in having political beliefs" portrayed in my artwork "a while ago, but not so much now."

While he might be hopeful about linking illustration with fine art, Seat depends on assignments from publications. Therefore his portfolio is ultimately designed to market his drawing talents. Inspired by the exaggerated caricatures of Philip Burke and grotesque figures of Lucian Freud, Seat's portfolio contains recognizable subjects such as Moore, Catherine Zeta-Jones and Kurt Vonnegut.

"For illustration work, it definitely needs to be an image that fits the needs for the publication," he said. He must be doing something right: His work has received awards from the Society of Illustrators, Communication Arts magazine and Print magazine.

He moved away from the busy sprawl of the Washington, D.C., bedroom community with his retired parents. Talented but shy, he's still struggling to find his footing.

"You know, finding work in illustration is certainly a slow progression for me," Seat said. In Virginia, he produced work for Military History magazine and taught occasional illustration workshops while working part time in a frame store. He's currently working on a series of illustrations for Read magazine, depicting George Orwell's Animal Farm for middle school-age readers.

Eric Seat selected for international
illustration competition
in New York City

(Feb. 2010)

contact:
W: www.ericseat.com
Tel: 703-727-5372


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Linda Schwermer

Linda Schwermer

Midoriworld Designs

Here you will find unique handmade jewelry. I am influenced by the simplicity of the Japanese style with an exotic twist. I try to recycle as much as possible and use mostly natural materials: waxed cotton cord, leather, rubber, carved bone and horn beads, antique hammered buttons as well as imported artifacts from Africa and China for interest. Each piece is handcrafted by me to be a unique and interesting piece of jewelry.

Descriptions:

#279 - African fish vertebra necklace. Fish vertebra, black glass beads, African trade beads with large black carved Asian disk.

#261 - Orange repurposed coral horizontal beads ladder stacked with black glass beads, black vinyl disks from Nigeria, brass Asian disks and hand bent brass rings also from Nigeria.

#340 - Hammered copper horizontal bar with strands of rough turquoise and copper beads for accent on copper chain.

#1008 - Wearable Art. Asymmetrical necklace. Rough amber beads, large brown African seed bead, carved bone Asian beads, on black rubber cord. Framed in black frame with handmade paper and torn recycled paper back ground. Necklace is easily removable to wear.


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Amy Schomaker

Amy Schomaker

Amy Schomaker’s love of texture and form are apparent in her diverse use of handmade paper, painted paper and low-relief dimensional collages and paintings. 

She completed a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree at the University of Missouri-Columbia in 1990 concentrating in oil painting and printmaking. A St. Louis native, she now considers Columbia Missouri her home. 

Amy is continuing to learn new techniques and applications in papermaking as a member of the Fiber Arts Study Group through the Columbia Weaver’s and Spinners Guild. Her work can be seen in a variety of locations throughout Columbia in the Art League’s Community Exhibit Program.


A medley of artwork lines both walls like playful sentinels. These are the colorfully manifest creations of Columbia artist Amy Schomaker, bringing life and light to the otherwise gray corridor of Boone County Regional Hospital. Bold acrylic paintings, silkscreen prints, delicate torn paper collages, and painted paper creations hang neatly, side by side. She holds no objections against exhibiting early work alongside her latest creations. “Art doesn’t have an expiration date like milk,” Schomaker contends. 

Schomaker pursued a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in oil painting as well as printmaking at the University of Missouri in the late 1980s. Additional art making techniques were acquired throughout the four years Schomaker spent teaching art to middle school students and the influences she encountered as a member of the Columbia Weaver’s and Spinner’s guild. Schomaker attributes much of her artistic growth to Leandra Spangler, a mentor and friend, who set inspiration in her to continue developing as an artist.

Although Schomaker’s artwork has many influences, the most essential influence is her own: and it proves to be the single tie that binds the variety of art forms together. Each work embodies Schomaker’s veneration of nature and her playful dance with unconventionality and inventiveness.

“You don’t have to color inside [the lines],” Schomaker insists. She allows this concept to trickle over into her paintings which are layered, folded, cut, burned, or torn to effect multi-dimensionality. Variations on these techniques encourage shadow play arising from the surrounding light situations to pass through the artwork, resulting in many transient impressions of the painting. 

Organic elements enter into Schomaker’s hand painted paper modeling and collages. She adds cooked down plant fibers to her handmade paper before “combing” distinctive textures onto each paper sheet. Her paper works are a continuation on the theme of mingling actual and applied perspectives and are what she describes as “low relief sculptures.” 

Schomaker regularly participates in quarterly community exhibit programs, Fiber Arts tours, and regional art exhibits. She has her sights set on expanding her audience and will undoubtedly continue developing and applying new techniques in her art forms as life itself unfolds alongside her.

by Lindsey Cole


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Marcia Rackley

Marcia Rackley

Marcia Rackley earned a BFA degree in Illustration from the University of Missouri where she received the “Outstanding BFA Student Award” (Jerry Berneche Award) and won 2nd place in the MU Chancellor’s Art Competition. Marcia likes working in clay, pen and ink, watercolor, oil, acrylic, pastel, charcoal and photography.

She is a native Missourian and a registered Cherokee who has worked as a freelance artist for many years. Her commissions include: 12 illustrations for the University of Missouri Savitar (1987); paintings, photographs and two almanac covers for Shelter Insurance; private commissions; medical illustrations for liver research and patient education (University Hospital); and a mural (painted at the age of 16) featured in the Missourian. In 2001, Marcia exhibited her polymer hand-sculpted art dolls in the 2001 International Toy Fair in New York City as a member of a professional doll maker’s guild. In 2014, Marcia won 1st place ribbons at the Missouri State Fair for two of her pastel paintings and later won an award for her pastel painting Peppers and Goblets at the Boone County Art Show in Columbia.

Marcia also enjoys digital photography. She has been exhibiting her nature photographs for the last three years at Runge Nature Center (Jefferson City) and Powder Valley Nature Center (Kirkwood). She has also exhibited in the J. Lottes Health Sciences Library at the University of Missouri Hospital. In 2014, her photograph of the American Painted butterfly was selected by the National Federation of Wildlife for inclusion in their 2015 card collection.

Marcia currently works at her alma mater, the MU Department of Art, where she is inspired and amazed every day by its art students and faculty. She is a member of the Columbia Art League and her most recent soft pastel paintings will be on display at the Central Bank of Boone County, 720 E. Broadway, Columbia, Missouri, beginning November 23, 2015 and continuing through the month of December 2015.


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Deni Cary Phillips

Deni Cary Phillips


Deni Cary Phillips ~ Infinity Photographs

denicaryphillipsphotographs.com

Infinity Photographs is both a definition and a goal.

It became my photographic identity when I realized the need for an artist statement. Loving the art you’re making and putting it into the world are two completely different things! So, as I considered why I wanted people to see my work, what my work had to offer, the obvious thing I looked for in subject matter, whether leaf, building, or a crack in the sidewalk, was the impulse to enter the scene—to immerse myself in some piece of mystery, and to find the light and angle to convey that feeling. I wanted to feel the timeless in every image I created, and then to share it with you. If my photographs cause you to wander in and stay awhile, that is the measure of my success.

Confessions of a life-long photo-maniac:

I've engaged in many creative hobbies in my life, and that is how photography began for me, shooting my mom's sacred Brownie box camera, then getting a Polaroid that spit out bad prints in seconds. Nothing like a little bit of instant gratification! Then the day came that I was heading out on a bird-watching expedition. I borrowed a friend's 35mm--and that was it. I was hooked. The photos were amazing. The flocks of geese I photographed lying flat on my back or belly-crawling on damp ground convinced me that there was more to photography than family holidays and vacations. A year later I held my very own 35mm camera. In those days, the less expensive way to go was slides, so I shot tray after tray, I think they held 200 frames, and subjected my friends to slide shows--at least those who would sit still for it. More than anything I wanted to process my own film, but I couldn't hack the chemicals. So that dream went by the wayside.

Fast-forward to 2006. Still shooting photos, acquiring more and more sophisticated cameras, I was headed for my first visit across the Atlantic, a life-long dream realized. I picked up a point-and-shoot Canon. It was great. Lightweight. Easy to load film into. Perfect. But it didn't produce the shots I was looking for. By my next experience abroad I was shooting DSLR. And that was the ticket. Now I could shoot all the shots there were to shoot (as long as I kept my battery full and room on the SD card), and process the photos. Before long I was learning all I could about photo-editing software, shooting raw, and seeking out my peers in the fast-growing world of digital photography. 

Years of shooting film had delivered great insights into the craft. Composition, framing, cropping. Color. Contrast. Tone. Shape. Eye movement. With great joy I watched as my photographs became better and better. Until, one day, I took a chance and entered a piece into a juried show. I got in. And I continued to get in. Over the last five years my work has been seen in dozens of juried shows locally and beyond. 

I feel that my photographs are ideally suited for the walls of your home, your business, or institutional settings--wherever a sense of timelessness and beauty will enhance the viewers experience.

You can often see my work on the walls of Columbia Art League, or in various locations around my home town, Columbia, Missouri, as well as online: Facebook, Instagram at InfinityPhotoDeni, Gurushots, Viewbug, Smugmug, and, of course, on my website, denicaryphillipsphotographs.com, where you can sign up for the blog, weekly pic(k), gallery notices, special offers, and the occasional freebie. I’ll consult with you on your decorating needs, and frame my work to create just the look you’re going for in your home or office.

I also work with creatives as an editor and biography consultant, design labels and marketing materials for food producers, and share studio space in downtown Columbia's art district. I welcome the opportunity to help with your writing, editing or design project.

 "Photography is a way of feeling, of touching, of loving." 

Ansel Adams



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Jacque Pepper

Jacque Pepper

I took a couple of pottery classes in college and fell in love with making pots. Though I decided to major and work in the field of social work, I never stopped playing with the clay. Creative endeavors took the back burner until a few years ago when I realized I needed to follow my heart and do what I love most. I have increasingly spent more time making pots and other art, such as sculpture and mobiles. Over the years, I have taken classes at Access Arts where I learned to use the wheel but had to give that up when I developed problems with my left arm. For the last couple of years, I’ve applied only hand-building techniques, which has actually suited me well. One of those blessings in disguise.

Shortly after my husband and I moved into our house in June of 2010, we built a workshop with a kiln room (well, my husband did the building and consulted with me about a few things). I am now able to do all aspects of ceramics from start to finish in my own space with my own kiln – a dream come true!

Another step I took a couple of years ago was to be a part of Artlandish Gallery where one of my sisters and I have a booth. (My sister does watercolor with pen and ink drawings.) It has been a great experience sharing space and volunteering time there with other artists. It was also the beginning of a change in the way I think about myself – I could sometimes call myself an artist. The other day, it dawned on me that of course I am an artist. I may not create work that’s as good as a lot of artwork, and I may not make (near) as much money as a lot of artists, but I am enjoying creating art – and sharing my work with others. That to me, in a nutshell, is what it’s all about.


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Renee Nilges

Renee Nilges

Art as Life

Creating art stills my mind and I can only think about the task at hand. The brush strokes quiet and comfort me. I even feel my breathing slow, and I am transported far away. Art is truly a gift in that it helps me live in the present and keeps me looking forward. I get so excited about a new piece that sometimes a painting is named before I even produce it. It’s already been created in my mind.

As a kid, I have always had my hands in something. I try many different mediums and like to experiment. There are endless possibilities to explore. Art is like an old friend that keeps welcoming me back to grow better than I was before.

I have been painting and drawing professionally since 1998. My journey began by drawing pencil portraits of people and pets. Soon people were asking me to do oil paintings of their homes and farms. In addition to fine art, a background in commercial art made it possible for me to create logos and illustrations. Commissions have included everything from painting murals and statues to illustrating a children’s book and coloring book. It has been quite an adventure so far.

In 2001, I began sharing art in a new way by teaching oil painting class. I am so proud of my students! It is a great joy to see them grow artistically. I’ve found growth too, through teaching them. In this right brain, left brain world, I tell them, “Just remember, when you’re painting, you’re in your right mind!”

Life as an artist is both rewarding and challenging. Yes, we have responsibilities, but there always has to be room to play. When I am really lost in a project and the hours fly by, that’s when it seems to just fall out of my brush and flow onto the canvas! Those are the pieces that people tell me they appreciate the most. It comes from a place I really don’t understand, but I am very thankful. The beauty between the real world we live in and the canvas start to blend together. That is when the art is real. That is when I eat, sleep and breathe art as life.

contact:
W: www.reneenilges.com
T: 573-680-9054


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Farah Nieuwenhuizen

Farah Nieuwenhuizen

Farah Nieuwenhuizen has lived and traveled throughout Western Europe, Brazil, Canada, and the United States of America. These experiences laid the basis for her lifelong concern with cultural diversity.

She studied painting at the Escola de Belas Artes in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, before she continued her studies in the visual arts at Washington University in St. Louis and at the University of Missouri in Columbia where she received her bachelor's degree in art education, K–12.

For twenty years she taught at Hickman High School in Columbia, where she was recognized as an outstanding teacher. She has written and reviewed art curriculum for the Columbia Public Schools. While teaching at Hickman High School, she became the major contributor to the production of the annual multicultural assembly.

Ms. Nieuwenhuizen has received several awards for her painting, batik, ceramics, jewelry, and fiber arts at the Missouri State Fair in Sedalia and art shows at the Boone County National Bank and the Columbia Art League. Her artwork has been on display in several regional art exhibits. Also, she has taught art education at the University of Missouri's College of Education, where she received a High Flyer Award in fall 2001.


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Randy McDermit

Randy McDermit

I am a local Columbia artist who has spent the majority of my life in or around Columbia. Most of my work has been with acrylic paint; however, I’ve also worked with charcoal, pastel, and pen and ink. I began college as an art major at Columbia College, but after two years I changed my major to psychology and transferred to MIZZOU. I didn’t pick it up again until after I graduated, moved to St. Louis, and started working for the state of Missouri. In St. Louis I moved into a studio apartment and started doing charcoal drawings, posting them all over my walls. At that time I wasn’t concerned with a finished product. I just attacked the paper with aggression and vigor and then set it aside to start another one. I didn’t show them to anyone for months, but steadily I felt I was making progress. Eventually I started working in bits of color using pastels until I developed a love of color.

My early work was almost exclusively charcoal and pastel and greatly shaped the development of my style. I always enjoyed the feel and expressiveness of charcoal and pastel. My application was loose, physical and cathartic. Whether it was the medium that drew me to my subject matter or the other way around, I found satisfaction in depicting simple, dramatic gestures, figures and faces. It was more about capturing the intensity of a single moment rather than complex narratives or concepts. When I made the gradual transition from pastel to acrylic, I brought with me the same approach. The translation has produced some interesting results, and those early days continue to influence my direction. When I get off track, I always go back and do a few charcoals to reconnect.

I have always found the task in every artwork is to bridge the elements of connection and conflict. I feel like if I am authentically connected and present everything else will fall into place. The older I get, the more I trust my intuition. I trust that if I am fully engaged in the process of self expression, a truth will reveal itself. Not every truth, but a truth nevertheless.

contact:
W:artaccidental.blogspot.com
Tel: 573-424-0216


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Kay McCarthy

Kay McCarthy

I can't remember a time in my life when I was not drawing, painting or working on an art project. Graduating from the University of North Dakota with a bachelor's degree in fine arts I soon found that my love of the arts would take another turn. I started with an administrative career in non-profits which ultimately translated into arts administration. Now retired from the City of Columbia's Office of Cultural Affairs, I spend as much of my time as possible doing what I love best...painting my favorite subjects, people and dogs, from photographs in my home studio. Nothing is more satisfying than using the medium of watercolor and seeing an image emerge to tell it's own story.

One day's happiness often predicts the next day's creativity. - Teresa Amabile


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Hope Martin

Hope Martin

I love to zoom in on something small and make it big! All those seemingly little details become large, prominent and important. To me, that is very important; all those little things. They’re not so little.

I aim, with my art, to make people slow down and notice the beauty of the things that they miss. I want to help people connect with that beauty and maybe even help them find a sense of wonder they didn’t know they were missing.


My medium of choice is pastels. I also use black ink with watercolor and sometimes instant coffee.

contact:
573-239-5606
www.hopemartinartist.com


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Karen Marshall

Karen Marshall

Kate Verna Photography

Karen Marshall has been a resident of Columbia since 2003, graduating in 2007 from Mizzou with an interdisciplinary degree in Women’s Studies and Photography.

She has had a lifelong love of photography and began taking photos in grade school. Her work covers a wide range of subject matter, although she particularly enjoys taking pictures of animals, interesting textures, and places that are seemingly lost in time such as long forgotten ruins on Route 66.

Karen’s other passion is travel. She has been to every continent except Africa and Antarctica, and hopes to one day take an extended around the world trip and document it in photos. Karen always has her camera with her on trips and has an extensive body of work from her travels.

Black and white and sepia photography also interest Karen. She experiments with making some street photography and landscape photos black and white or sepia evoking a timelessness.

Why Kate Verna?

The name Kate Verna came from combining a nickname with her grandmother's maiden name as a tribute to her. Karen’s photos of Italy were taken during a trip to visit the Verna side of the family.

Awards

  • 2012 - Honorable mention in the Columbia, Missouri, Visions Photography competition.
  • 2013 - Photo selected to be in a juried show, the Visions Pho-Rest, at Art in the Park in Columbia.
  • 2014 & 2015- Two cat photos selected to appear in the Baker Taylor Publishing cat calendar, one in 2014 and one in 2015.
  • 2015 - Missouri State Fair honorable mention in the open photography competition for a photo of Westphalia, Missouri.

contact:
W: www.katevernaphotography.com


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Jennifer L. Market

Jennifer L. Market

As a photographer, I have found the natural beauty contained within Missouri and beyond to be my inspiration. I have been toting a camera along as part of my everyday life and my travels for over 20 years and strive to take that extra time to capture what others may miss in a hectic busy world. As one who was trained originally to shoot images onto film and has now transitioned to digital equipment, I still strive to perfect the image before pressing the shutter and not embellishing afterwards in the darkroom or via computer. I keep those methods in my photographic toolbox, but I try to frame and edit an image onsite naturally, using available light and shadow, and let the compositions speak for themselves.

In some ways photography has become an integral part of all of our lives, whether it is a way to remember a special moment like a child’s birthday or to capture a trip and keep the images in a scrapbook to share with others who weren’t there. Some also consider these moments to be art and frame the images to be mounted on walls to enhance their everyday life. I hope that what I showcase here now, and in the future, leaves you inspired to take the time to find and appreciate the hidden magic in your everyday life.

contact info:
T: 573-443-7710
W: jlmarketphotography.com


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Bonnie Margolis

Bonnie Margolis

Watercolor Acrylic Mixed Media

I am a long-time resident of Columbia. Recently retired from many years teaching American and Women’s History, I have enjoyed art since my parents first provided me with crayons, paper and paints as a little girl growing up in Ohio.

I have always been enamored of the Impressionist painters and try to capture that sense of light and color in my work. My seascapes and landscapes have been inspired by summers spent in northern Michigan and visits to the coast of Maine. I play the flute and piano and have rendered my flute in a variety of media - watercolor, pencil, lithographs and pen and ink.

I have taken classes at the Cleveland Institute of Art and studied privately with Sandy Diamond in Cleveland in addition to workshops in drawing, Japanese woodblock printing, lithography, watercolor and acrylic as a student at the Interlochen Arts Academy in Michigan and later at the University of Missouri, Columbia. I am delighted to have the time and space in my home to pursue art more fully and enjoy experimenting in mixed media. I am a member of the Columbia Art League and the Mid-Missouri Arts Alliance of Ashland, MO.


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Bill Manion

Bill Manion

Returning to regular work with brush and pen has been an experience to which I have long looked forward. Now time and a fun place to work give me the opportunity to try styles and combinations.

I don’t have any rules going into a painting or a cartoon. Sometimes I have an idea of what I want but most of the time I just let the abstraction happen or the humor of the character build. I love the shape of bottles and vessels and work these into much of what I do. I am interested in cartoon outlines and the flows of abstract. All figure paintings start with a cartoon. Under all paintings somewhere there is an abstract. Some of my work blends the two. As an abstract grows with layer after layer of color I begin to see a form or a shape, or I will sketch out a form and begin, looking for the energy of color that makes a work pop.

Works of art should brighten and highlight every wall, so I like to play with color. I am not afraid of color, especially the deep hues and tones of red and its compliments. A blend of red and yellow, wet into wet, makes me smile. A black and white painting or drawing can gain dimension with that splash of color that gives it life or makes a mood. I love watching how light changes through a wine bottle. I love the colors of sunsets over the water. I will keep trying to capture those colors, tones, humor, moods, and the great feeling of forever sunsets that a work of art brings to me and to others.

Designs, cartoons, and the love of fine art has been a part of my life since high school. The dream of learning to draw and paint showed in air brushed T-shirts in college. Later, a cartoon, “Catch Pen,” laughing with the Cowboy life by “Billy Bob and friends,” was in rodeo news and horseman magazines for several years. A time to get serious with a business career delayed regular art work for several years. I continued to study with artist friends around the country while building a major art collection and working with art support groups in several cities. Moving back to Missouri with a fun studio overlooking the Lake of the Ozarks, I have returned to drawing, design, and movement of color. Paintings have placed in juried shows along with character development and design for commercial operations.

in studio with Mystique


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Melynda Lotven

Artist Statement

Living in the country is my heaven on earth, a magical place where gourds come alive and whatever can be dreamed can be created. I turn moldy gourds into keepsake treasures. Chinese culture believes that the gift of a gourd is a gift from the heart wishing all the best things in life.

If you are not familiar with gourds, there is no time like the present.  Dried gourds have been used for artwork, water containers, musical instruments, utensils, and more for thousands of years.  A properly dried gourd will last for years.  In galleries, museums, and private collections, you can find gourds that are hundreds and thousands of years old from cultures across the globe.  

Because gourds grow in various shapes based upon the seed, I obtain them from various growers around the country based upon shape and availability.  In my work I paint whole gourds and I have developed my own style of  gourd sculpting, using a combination of full gourds and cut pieces .  All finished pieces are sealed with a water based polycrylic sealer.  I give many presentations and conduct gourd art project classes for both children and adults.  Your comments and questions about gourds are very welcome.   

Bio

Melynda Lotven is an artist, wife, mother of three, founder and first president of the Show Me Gourd Society, member of the American Gourd Society, and a juried member of the Best of Missouri Hands. She has been featured in magazines, books, videos, on HGTV, on DIY Network, and as a visiting artist at Silver Dollar City in Branson, Missouri. Prior to her discovery of gourd art in 1993 she was trained and schooled in watercolor, oils, and acrylics.  

Contact:
Enchanted Gourd Art
5401 O’Neal Rd.
Columbia, MO. 65202

573-489-1054
www.enchantedgourdart.com

www.facebook.com/enchantedgourdart

Email: mlotven@centurylink.net

 


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