Ken Logsdon

Ken Logsdon

Around 1991, I met an artist in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, at an arts fair. Turned out this artist, Edie Dismuke, lived just a few blocks from me in northwest Denver. She made postage stamp jewelry and cards. One day when I was visiting her home studio, I suggested she add Churchill quotations (a passion of mine at the time) to her Churchill stamp cards. She declined but said something like "Be my guest." Thus Post-a-Quote was born. In two years time, I left a successful business partnership and moved with my wife Lynnette and two children to Columbia, Missouri, to pursue Post-a-Quote fulltime. I've been at it ever since.

Post-a-Quote was named before there was a worldwide web like today's. The name was a pun. On a blank greeting card I would handwrite a quotation to match an image on a postage stamp. The buyer of the card would then, in the British manner, “post” it to friends or family.

I have continued for the last 22 years to handwrite the quotations on each and every card. I'm often asked why, and I always say I do it because it further connects me to the words. I came to Post-a-Quote as a reader and collector of quotations, not as an artist. In that regard, I am self-taught. That's not to say that in addition to Ms. Dismuke there have not been people along the way who have helped me better myself as an artist.

Though I began with postage stamps as the anchor for the quote, over the years I began using vintage illustrations, artwork by noted Oklahoma artist D.J. Lafon and photographs by my sister, Claudia Hunter. Eventually my photo bug of earlier years was reignited. I discovered I could be my own illustrator for all those quotes I loved and for which I couldn't find a matching image. It is my own photos that I use now almost exclusively.

A couple of years ago I became involved with the Columbia Art League and have exhibited my photographs in several shows. The themed nature of the exhibits has challenged me and, I believe, made me a better artist. The Interpretations show of August 2013, dreamed up by Diana Moxon, the executive director of CAL, challenged me further artistically than anything so far. I look forward to more challenges in that venue.

In addition to quote cards I also do photo cards. Both are available in Columbia or can be purchased online. You may email me to see if I have a retailer in your area.

-Ken Logsdon
contact:
W:www.postaquote.com


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Changwon Lee

Changwon Lee

My specialty is mechanical engineering, in which I hold a Phd. During my career I worked as a government officer, a researcher for a national research institute, and a general manager for a large organization. I only started oil painting after my retirement in 2011, when I attended an oil painting class at the Institute of Fine Arts and Design Education in Korea. Since then I have painted every day. My first solo exhibition was in Seoul in 2012. Since then my solo exhibitions have been centered on the theme of "Dream of Recombination". My painting is a creative journey to put small recollections from the past into a backpack, get on the wagon of the present, and leave for the future. In my third solo exhibition, the theme was Recombination III with respect to the communion between nature and life.

I believe that the creative journey is through a process of Trans-reality. Creative Trans-realism is a journey wherein the artist uses an endless stream from his conscious and subconscious beyond everyday life, through past life and mental imagery. This endless journey of consciousness is infinitely sustainable and brings artistic freedom and peace.

contact:
W: www.artabus.com/changwon/
W: www.facebook.com/changwon.lee.9083


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India Marie Knowles

India Marie Knowles

For as long as I can remember there has been an artist within eager to break free and express herself. Occasionally I have found an outlet for my high need to create, but jewelry making has captured my imagination as nothing I have tried before. Since retiring from my private practice as a licensed professional counselor in 2002, what I began as a hobby has evolved into an addiction and is now a small business. Most of my work incorporates semiprecious gemstones and sterling silver or 14K gold-filled wire and findings. I also enjoy using lampwork and other handcrafted beads.

Most recently, however, bead embroidery has become my obsession. Gemstones, small freshwater pearls, tiny seed beads and bugle beads lend themselves to unlimited designs and color. I love allowing the patterns to evolve as I work rather than utilizing a plan. Pieces that are asymmetrical in design almost always prove to be gratifying to me, as I like seeing the final coming together of seemingly disparate components.

It is always a joy to see people wearing and apparently enjoying pieces I have made, and I am especially pleased when items are purchased as gifts. A song by Harry Chapin entitled “Mr Tanner” comes to mind when I consider my work. Mr. Tanner, the owner of a dry cleaning shop, loved to sing but was panned by critics in his first New York concert. The line, “He did not know how well he sang; it just made him whole” is a poignant theme in the song. As I look at the works of other jewelry artists, I do not know how well I create; it just makes me whole.

Items are available for viewing and/or purchase at
Columbia Art League in Columbia and Missouri Hawthorn Galleries in Springfield, Missouri, or by appointment (contact info below).

contact info:
Tel: 573-449-7754


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Peggy King

Peggy King

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Snow Flake Glass

An affirmed non-artist, I “found” glass at the age of 50. After working for decades as an office manager and then energy analyst, it was a complete surprise when the right side of my brain kicked in. I am unable to explain why, on a whim, I signed up for a lampworking class. Melting that glass over a torch to create a bead was pure magic. But I became frustrated when I didn’t seem to have the ability to make the bead look like I wanted. So I went back and took a class on fusing. Melting glass became an immediate passion and I bought my first kiln that very same day.

Early in my glass journey I learned that the skills I used in an earlier flirtation with patchwork quilting transferred directly to my glass work. I have become known for my ability to effectively combine color, texture and pattern in my artwork. My enamel pieces are a riot of color, demanding attention with their bright, saturated colors. My dichroic glass works make a distinct statement in their bold designs. I enjoy incorporating a variety of highly detailed decorative accents, including hand made lampworked elements and hand pulled murinni.

Following where my passion for glass took me, and with some gentle encouragement by a dear lady, I joined The Best of Missouri Hands (BOMH) and found a place for myself among the remarkable, accepting people there. Suddenly there were more doors open to me than I knew what to do with and opportunities to give something of myself back to the organization, including serving on the Board of Directors, and as President for two terms. Through my association with BOMH, I have been taken in, accepted and encouraged by all manner of artists, and been able to contribute to their journey even as they contribute to mine.

The practice of melting glass to create beautiful works of art is ancient. Today’s studio glass industry is ever changing with new technologies, products, and techniques. This gift was bestowed upon me as I began looking to retirement from my real world job. Now, as I look to the future, there are many ideas in my head and products or techniques on my list of things I want to work with, I know my glass art will continue to provide a rich and active retirement.

contact info:
W:www.snowflakeglass.com
Past President, Best of
Missouri Hands


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Jim Jones

Jim Jones

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I have never felt really comfortable calling myself a Photographer.  I am more comfortable saying that "I gather images" - little bits of things that I see.  And then I 'do things' to those images and sometimes what evolves turns into something totally different and I hope more pleasant to look at.

 

I first remember taking pictures when I was in eight grade.  The first time that I can remember "seeing" a picture that I wanted to take was on a family trip from Wisconsin to North Carolina.  We were going through the Appalachians and I don't know if it was Kentucky or what, but there was coal mines everywhere and wild roses growing on the coal shale piled up along the tracks.  I saw this one huge, black, mountain of shale and there was this one beautiful rose growing on it.  It was on the other side of the railroad tracks from the road and I begged Dad to stop the car so I could get closer for a picture. I still can't believe that he actually stopped to let me do it.  I think he may have regretted it when a coal train came by and trapped me on the other side of the tracks.  My siblings didn't stop reminding me for a long time that there had 330 cars of coal, it was moving slow, there was coal dust everywhere and it was hot in the car waiting for me (no car A/C in those days).

 

Many people have been patient with me over the years while I was gathering images in one way or another.  I just hope that the images that I produce bring some joy to those who see them.

contact:
W: www.jonesartworks.com


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Hannah Hollister Ingmire

Hannah Hollister Ingmire

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A stroke of luck started my art career when a kindergarten painting I did of an exhausted train climbing up a mountain was accepted in a traveling exhibit of Pennsylvania children’s art and hung in a Philadelphia art museum. After that, it was all downhill! Still, I loved making pictures and continued with private lessons until college. I graduated from Grinnell College with a B.F.A. in painting and did postgraduate work at the University of Iowa where I studied with Mauricio Lasansky, the printmaker. I also attended Quincy University where I got a teacher's degree in art and taguth at Quincy High School for two years. I have continued to teach adults throughout my career.

Again, I had a stroke of luck when I was invited to have an exhibit at the Quincy, Illinois Public Library, who then commissioned me to do a 25-foot mural. At this time, I went into painting full time. I have had several one-woman shows and spent the next 30 years doing juried art festivals. Midwestern shows include: the Original Art Fair (Ann Arbor, MI), The Plaza Art Festival (Kansas City, MO), The Milwaukee Art Museum Lakefront Show, and several in St. Louis. Florida shows include: Los Olas Art Festival, Winter Park, Coconut Grove, Miami Beach, the University of Miami Art Festival, and Mainsail (St. Petersburg). During this period, I also was asked by the Bradford Exchange, an international collector plate company, to design 2 series of plates.

For 40 years my medium was transparent watercolor, and my subject matter was traditional realism. My work can be found in businesses, hospitals, and banks, as well as private collections.

In 2009, I had another stroke of luck - but the kind that led to tremors which meant that I could no longer paint with my past precision. Since painting is literally as necessary to me as eating, I found another way to express myself. Having trained at Grinnell College in the sixties with a wonderful abstract expressionist, Richard Cervene, I turned to big canvases and big brushes. Now, instead of meticulously preplanning each work, I wade in with my instincts. The result has been very freeing for me. Although my tremors have subsided, I continue to paint in this manner because it makes me happy and, I hope, my viewers!

For a private viewing, please contact me below.


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Sharyn Hyatt

Sharyn Hyatt

Sharyn received her undergraduate degree from the University of Georgia, her Masters of Fine Arts from Clemson University, and has studied and traveled in Europe. She has taught art at the secondary and college levels, has published in several journals, and has work on the cover of three books. Hyatt's work can be found in numerous public and private collections including the Asheville Art Museum, Southwestern Bell of St. Louis, Boone County National Bank, the University of Missouri Hospital and Clinics, the Columbia Chamber of Commerce, and the collection of August Busch Jr. In addition she has shown in numerous group shows as well as in 14 solo exhibitions.

For the past 25 years, Hyatt has considered her most creative endeavor to be teaching and she has had the privilege of working with more than 2,000 emerging young artists. Sharyn feels most comfortable with the titles "teacher" and "mom" but as of 2008 could be found edging back into the art scene.


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John Michael Holman

John Michael Holman

The portrait/landscape/ narrative has been a familiar subject within my history of painting. The process of creating and methodology allows me to develop each piece individually. It also brings me the most satisfaction; even if considered imperfect or slightly awkward in technique by academic standards. Being a self-taught artist has its rewards and allows me the freedom to go outside the lines and paint what I feel and see without restraint.

My more visceral works are achieved through the application of metallic paints plus the occasional inter-vention of the ‘happy accident’ or chance. All these elements contribute in the process of making or de-constructing my paintings. The creative process for me is one of release, provocation and ultimately my way of expressing my memories of places visited and the emotional attachments that accompany them.

This is more apparent as the viewer approaches the completed works; with surfaces dissolving into a color pallet of irregular textures and unconscious imagery. From an academic perspective, I break rules and as a self-taught artist I am completely at peace with that concept. I paint what I feel and if it provokes the viewer with any reaction whether good or bad; then I have done my job.

Thank you for viewing my creations.

Contact:
T: 660-202-2428
W: www.facebook.com/john.m.holman


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Kerry Mulvania Hirth

Kerry Mulvania Hirth

I was born with the ability to hear in color, a blending of the senses called synesthesia.  I use that natural ability to paint music.  Although they may appear to be abstract, my paintings are grounded in my personal experience of sound.  For me, music is lit up with color and full of patterns to recognize, problems to solve, and connections to make.  Essentially, my paintings are a code that I use to make sense of and record what I think and experience.  No matter how sophisticated a problem is or how fragile or fleeting a thing is before me, I can use my paint to comprehend it and reflect it truly.

contact info:
W: www.kerryhirth.com


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Jan Hager-Klein

Jan Hager-Klein

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I’m a listener and a watcher...have been all my life. My professional life took me to 11 countries in Europe, Asia, all over the USA as a Human Resources manager, a counselor, and college professor.

Now I’m in Missouri and have enjoyed painting for the last 14 years, alone or with friends on destination painting experiences. Italy has called us twice; Hopetown, Bahamas was a great alone get away; and Carmel, California calls again and again. I’ve taken classes at Webster University and private lessons with Dong Feng Li, Billyo O’Donnel, John Porter Lasater IV, Qiang Huang, and with Ruo Li.

I paint because I like the process. Each painting is like a puzzle that I slowly put together whether is it a landscape, city scape, interior, or abstract. I come from painters with a mother, brother, and a son who all make their living as painters. I grew up with my mother - Helen Hager - painting to classical music when I got home from school. The smell of turpentine and open windows back then was a peaceful happy time.

I hope you enjoy my work.


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Elle Hinnah

Elle Hinnah

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Elle has been passionate about art and creating things all of her life. It started out with sewing when she was just 4 years old. Her grandmother, who hand-stitched elaborate Barbie Doll clothes, told her she could learn to sew when she could thread her own needle. Elle, never being one to think she was unable to do anything, accepted the challenge and relentlessly attempted to thread the needle until the task was accomplished. That drive and passion is still ever present in everything she does.

Elle’s focus now is metalsmith jewelry made with copper, silver, or brass and features gemstones. She also enjoys making wire-wrapped jewelry with silver, gold and rose gold wire. She has always had a fascination with gemstones and enjoys working with natural stones. She also enjoys working with different metals, her favorite being silver.

She finds inspiration for her pieces in many different places. For gemstone pieces, she tries to think of what will complement each individual stone best, making each piece a unique creation. Sometimes inspiration comes from the shape of a piece of metal. Other times, it’s none of those things. It could be a piece made with a specific person in mind. These are her favorite pieces to make: pieces that compliment a person’s character and personality.

Elle is accepting commissioned worked through appointment.

contact:
W: www.kre8vstudioz.com


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William Farrand

William Farrand

I had a few art courses in college. If the draft had not been breathing down my neck in 1969, I would have changed majors from biology to fine arts. After the army, my career with National and State Park agencies led me to many places people rarely find. Within the grand landscapes of Missouri and the western United States there are hidden, intimate spaces. Using snapshots to help find a view for composition, I try to let my experiences with place and my love of color flow onto paper. I experimented with acrylics and watercolor before finding water color pencils. Their range of color, adaptability to wash, and control of detail seemed to fit my efforts to recreate my favorite places on watercolor paper. I still look for those hidden places, but when found, I now mentally extract their subtle colors and assemble a view that attempts to relate the experience.

I live and draw in Columbia, calling it home for the second time. It’s the best town I have found in nine states.


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Jack Eyler

John F. (Jack) Eyler

Jack Eyler graduated from the University of Missouri School of Journalism in 1952 with a major in advertising. He retired in 1986 as CEO of an advertising agency. 

During his years at Mizzou he drew cartoons for the campus humor magazine Showme, was art director for a production of the musical Carousel, and was the producer for two years of the Savitar Frolics, a campus show of musical skits. 

Over the years since then, Jack has painted watercolors. He paints a wide variety of subjects, primarily from photographs, including candid pictures of people, pets and wild life as well as community landmarks, events, historic buildings, personal residences, still lifes, old barns and landscapes, particularly winter scenes. His studio is located on a farm outside Columbia.


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Diane Epstein

Diane Epstein

I have been a freelance graphic designer for more than thirty-six years throughout the Midwest. I have designed print materials for many fields including television, magazines, small business, educational programs, and the non-profit sector. I have been involved in all stages of the graphics process from design to final print.

Over the last few years I have been drawing/painting with pastels and watercolors, creating portraits of people and animals. My passion is drawing portraits for the parents of children who have either passed on or have a terminal illness. These are sent to the parents as a condolence gift.


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Cynthia Durost

Cynthia Durost

I paint because I am struck by the multitude of colors and sights of Nature. I paint as a form of meditation releasing my energy, joy, sadness, or love. I paint as an expression of my relation to the whole, to Nature. The browns, blues, ochres, reds, purples, blacks, and yellow are so vivid; even the snow presents color in reverse. I also have a longing for the space of Nature: the sky, the water, the trees, the rocks opening up. I see the relationship between forms and space - two trees stand juxtaposed leaning and finally encircling each other, two friends. I want only to keep recording my feeling in the natural space. The best of my painting experience exists in my being present spontaneously painting with the flow of water and color.

Sometimes, I paint a scene over and over, later to learn a message exists. In New Mexico, for instance, I paint a mountain scene again and again, later to learn Zuni women ascend the heights of this mountain to gather a ceremonial flower which grows only on this mountain. I am drawn to certain places, the fields and marshes and woods of New England, the canyonlands, rivers, and mountains of New Mexico and Arizona, the islands of Cape Verde, or the rainforests of Costa Rica. There is for me a connecting force between mind and Nature, a play of consciousness and spirit. I acknowledge land and wild animals, and especially the space without the importance of humans. The artist in me follows instinct and intuition, is connected to all peoples, crosses all boundaries, is open and searching.

I also believe firmly in sharing and passing on the tradition and experience of painting and being an artist. In this exchange with many others, I continue to learn and grow and play.

contact info:
T: 573-355-2294


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Mary Douglass

Mary Douglass

Hello! Welcome to my corner of the art community. I have lived in the Columbia area 57 years and am a graduate of the University of Missouri-Columbia. I am a world traveler, photographer, watercolor artist, educational researcher, mother, grandmother, gardener, chef, wine maker, equestrienne, and tailor. After a lifetime of creating visual arts and vagabonding about the globe, I am sharing my work and the wonders I have found with you. Some of the places you’ll find in my work include many of our states, South Africa, New Zealand, and Scotland. I hope you enjoy what you see, and perhaps may inspire you to pick up crow quill, brush, or camera yourself. Thank you for sharing a bit of your time with mine.


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Rebecca Douglas

Rebecca Douglas

I make landscapes using fabric and thread. I choose to reflect the beauty of our natural world with the color and textures of cloth. My work is representational in the manner of landscape painting, yet rooted in the fine craft tradition of quilting. I strive for images similar to oil painting done with a palette knife, but fabric is tactile and begs to be touched. My work combines raw fuzzy edges, smooth turned lines and sculptural qualities of quilted images.

Often unobserved and ignored, the landscapes of our world are waiting to bestow their gifts of serenity and beauty. The simple gifts of light and shadow, sun and cloud, tree and bird inspire me to reflect the goodness in our world. I hope to inspire viewer to partake in the same.

About the Artist

Rebecca Douglas maintains a studio in Columbia, MO. She works by commission and offers her work at Bluestem Missouri Crafts Gallery in Columbia, MO. Rebecca is available for workshops and trunk shows. She can be reached by email (see contact info on left). You can also see more of her work on her website at rebeccadouglasquiltart.com

She displays her work both nationally and locally, most recently earning a 1st prize for textiles at the Boone County Art Show. She has displayed her work at Quilting Natural Florida II; at the Florida Museum; Mancuso Quilt Show in West Palm Beach, FL; American Quilter’s Show in Paducah, KY; and Iowa. She was featured in the Columbia Tribune as a featured local artist and her work has been published in Art Quilt Studio and Somerset Sews magazines.


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Nancy DeClue

Nancy DeClue

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by Lindsey Howald

Although her content can vary from meditations on religious texts to vibrant abstracts from nature, Nancy DeClue’s work is consistently alive. The beauty of her painting is that while deeply influenced by the innate ebb and flow of nature’s energy, it seldom depicts the very landscape that inspired her. Rather, it is the fuel of conceptualism that drives her work, and the way it is translated onto the canvas often seems completely separate from the moment that inspired it.

“The work takes on its own life,” she says. “Like going from air to a molecule, it’s an evolution.”

DeClue, born in 1954 in Jefferson City, originally came to the University of Missouri to get her art history degree: “I was going to be the best damn curator ever,” she laughs. However, practicality called, and DeClue put this dream aside to begin what would be a lifelong, devoted career in nursing. Currently a nurse at the Missouri Cancer Associates, DeClue admits, “It has turned out that I do love it. But it’s not my passion.”

Like all true artists, DeClue cannot remember a time in her life she wasn’t creating. She began to pursue her work in earnest in 2002, when complications from a neck surgery forced her to slow down life’s obligations, allowing her art to flood in. In 2005, she was selected for an intensive period of study at the prestigious Santa Fe Art Institute. For two months, DeClue lived and worked in community with other artists in art-infused New Mexico, which helped her develop her own personal style.

“I didn’t realize until several years ago that all people didn’t see the world the way I did,” she says. “It was like an epiphany – I realized that what I do is truly different.”

DeClue’s lack of formal art training has both its advantages and disadvantages. Though she admits she sometimes gets in over her head with a project, never having learned the limitations of certain media allows her to work purely from the visions that appear in her head. As with Small Wonders (upper right), the 2005 work to thank for her acceptance to the Santa Fe Art Institute, DeClue had never been warned a 48”x54” linoleum block print would be an ambitious project, and therefore didn’t think to shy away from it. Small Wonders, which is a cry for this culture to reverse its de-mystification of Nature, now hangs in DeClue’s downtown coffee haunt, Lakota.

Rather than settling for representation, DeClue entreats viewers to enter her state of mind. In a recent multi-media collage series she has nicknamed The Word (bottom right), she writes or pastes text from altar prayers, a German Bible and other cultural religious influences, creating chaos from structural antiquity. By forcing these concepts to collide, she disrupts the mutual exclusivity these old religions have claimed.

“The concept is, God is God,” she explains. “What is the difference between religions? Why are we pointing the finger and damning one another? There is a universality here.”

Freed from the burden of defining her work in art historical terms, DeClue allows her art, simply, to be what it is. When asked about her influences, she shakes her head firmly. “I look at all other work, and there’s nothing I find that I don’t like. I take every opportunity to see every piece of art I can.”


Artist Statement

‘the image chooses the artist’, Evri Kwong to myself, 2005.

The ‘image’ has always chosen me. It can be triggered by a dream, a concept, an event, a social reality, a tiny bloom, an insect with gossamer wings-something touches my soul.

The ‘image’ or idea stays with me. It gestates. It then chooses a medium. It grows in intensity until I have to let it out. The resulting work or works often take on a life of their own. Almost self determined.

This is how a series or large piece is conceived. This is my motivation-love colored with passion.

My thirty plus years as a nurse, and especially my years in oncology, place these constructs within my unique life experience and philosophy.

Deep respect and acute appreciation for all forms of life are interwoven with spirituality. Often a statement of society and its ‘norms’ or direction (especially when childishly self-serving) are veiled in my pieces. It is what drives my production.

Sometimes-sheer breathtaking beauty is the muse.

Sometimes-the attempt to grasp quantum mechanics. Perhaps-music, or the laugh of a child.

ART IS THE REPRESENTATION OF PASSION.

Contact:
T: 573-590-0162


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Marilyn Cummins

Marilyn Cummins

"In the depth of winter, I finally learned that there lay in me an invincible summer." – Albert Camus

As I work and experiment with a variety of media – oil, watercolor, mixed-media in two and three dimensions, photography – I strive more and more to let go vs. trying to control the medium or exact image. When I’m successful, the invincible summer in me is able to find its voice and reach out to others in ways that are sometimes peaceful and serene; other times edgy and ironic.

I’ve always been a person of many interests – one often leading to or overlapping another. It was an assignment to cover the Columbia art community in word and photos for a magazine that led me to the first painting workshop Joel Sager offered in 2007. I signed up, finally jumping headfirst into something I’d wanted to pursue more seriously since childhood. With Joel’s encouragement, I’ve continued to paint with him and on my own nearly every week since, growing with his expert guidance and inspiration coupled with a nurturing Columbia art community.

I often work by layering combinations of oils, acrylic, collage and tar washes in one piece, sometimes using watercolor sketches inspired by my own photography of the land or of people. The rather minimalist watercolor landscapes have begun to stand on their own, which amazes me after I feared the medium for so many years. I’m having fun with occasional 3-D adventures, usually repurposing old instruments (I’m also a musician) and other found items. I enjoy combining paint, collage and wash techniques while solving tricky structural challenges by dusting off my tool box and shop skills.

The relaxation, stimulation, lowered blood pressure, new life and new friendships my art brings me is extremely satisfying, spurring me on to push myself, to see what more I can learn and do and share. Having my work juried into shows and finding its way into so many peoples’ homes so soon is an amazing, surprising bonus for which I’m very grateful.

Marilyn Cummins
Invincible Summer Studios
At Orr Street Studios

contact info:
Tel: 573-239-1229


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Peg Crawford

Peg Crawford

It would seem artists have always played a tug-of-war between intent and medium: what they want to say and how they want to say it. Traditionally they have looked to their surrounding environment to satisfy this. Wood, stone, clay and reed were the materials they used to express their creativity. Their environment was reflected in, and utilized as, their art.

Today, we have the richness of the world available to us in the time it takes to drive to the art supply store. Overwhelmed by this choice, I wanted to return to these roots of expression. In my journey, no matter where I lived or traveled, I found one material in almost embarrassing abundance: Paper.

In exploring this material, I found incredible strength along with delicate flexibility. This lightweight, low-tech, and eco-friendly material offered artistic challenge along with unexpected durability. It’s the perfect medium in a modern, mobile society.

I blend my own paper clay using mostly recycled papers, producing a soft, fibrous clay. I then sculpt using some of the same methods of earthen clay sculpture, along with a few improvised ones to accommodate the texture and workability of the clay. My sculptures are made of solid paper, without the use of wood or metal armatures. This extra challenge forces me to slow down and immerse myself in the process, which I count as an added bonus in a busy world.

After 30 years of living and traveling throughout the U.S. and overseas, my husband and I have quite happily settled in Columbia, where we plan to stay. 


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